Solar Eclipse Sights

This is adapted from a post I wrote for the wonderful Momma over at A Momma’s View. For the original version, click here.

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The total solar eclipse is an incredible phenomenon, one that I hope to see myself someday.

It isn’t often that an astronomical event occurs of such magnitude that people of all walks of life from all around the globe are drawn to one measly 65-mile wide strip of land, to crowd in like sardines as they watch the world change around them.

What’s important to realize about a total solar eclipse, versus just an annular one, is that it’s a people event.

Scientists do take this opportunity to study the sun’s corona, an outer layer of gases that’s usually too faint to be seen. But in general, this is an event for crowds to enjoy.

And enjoy it they do. I have never known another event of astronomical significance to populate the web and turn heads like a total solar eclipse.

But what happens during a solar eclipse? What can you expect to see, and how can you protect your eyes from the sun’s damaging rays? Continue reading

The Annular Eclipse

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An annular solar eclipse is…an interesting sight, to say the least.

(I sincerely hope the photographer didn’t fry his camera taking this picture. Enough light from the sun is still reaching us to fry your retina, or damage your optics…)

The annular eclipse is not to be confused with an annual eclipse. When my dad first got excited about it back in 2012, preparing us for the spectacular sight of a solar eclipse in May, I wondered why the heck we hadn’t done this every year before.

The fact is, I’d never heard the word “annular,” so I thought Dad was just wrong.

But in reality, “annular” means something very different from “annual.” Continue reading

The Solar Eclipse

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A solar eclipse is the most amazing astronomical sight you’ll ever see.

Not only is it the only time you’ll ever be able to clearly see the “new moon” phase of the moon, it’s the only time you’ll ever see the sun’s corona. And it’s the only time that, under very specific circumstances, you can actually look directly at the sun for a few moments.

But before you get too excited about that, let me tell you what’s happening in the sky—and give you a few important safety warnings!

(This is just the first of a few posts that will talk about solar eclipses; they’re all worthy of a read. Even if you don’t read all of mine, make absolutely certain you’re caught up on safety warnings before you view a solar eclipse!) Continue reading