Science Questions, Anybody? (#2)

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Most of the time, when I publish posts on this blog, I choose a topic and write about it in the hopes that you’re curious about it. But I also want to know what you are curious about—always.

I want to call your attention to the “Got Questions?” link up in the menu.

This link will take you to a page that invites you to submit a question. Anything about science, anything you’re curious about, just type it out and hit “Submit!” My door is always open, so to speak—that page will always be available.

I’ll still send out posts like this one asking for your questions. But I want you to know that you never have to wait to ask a question. Science is all about being inquisitive, and you should never have to wait for me to prompt you. But you can, if you want 😉

Anyway, this is another “Science Questions” post—you’re welcome to ask whatever you want in the comments below. I’ll address your questions in the order they’re submitted and let you know when the post is published.

And please, by all means head over to my “Got Questions?” page. I want to know what you’re curious about. I want to answer your questions. Most of all, I want this blog to be a place where you feel free to wonder. A curious mind is a healthy thing!

Remember, everyone—there are no stupid questions, only stupid answers. I promise to answer anything you ask to the best of my ability.

Questions, anyone?

Life vs. Rocks: What Makes Them Different?

Welcome to my third “Science Answers” post! About a month ago, I sent out a post requesting science questions from all of you; you can find it here. This post addresses the third of the questions I was asked. If you have a question, you can ask it in the comments here or on that post, or ask it in an email. Or find me on Facebook!

Q: What is the division between the physical and life sciences? For example, why do we think of rocks in a different category than we do plants and animals? (asked by Katherine)

Okay, wow. Another great question! This one is almost as fundamental as gravity, which I answered earlier.

Gravity may be pretty much the singular reason why the universe works the way it does, but the difference between the physical and life sciences is an important distinction when trying to understand the world around us.

So let’s start with what we know. When you hear “physical science,” what do you think of?

 

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You might think of any number of things—but I’ll bet you that none of those things are alive in the traditional sense.

So, how about the biological sciences? What does that make you think of?

 

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Maybe plants…or cute animals?

Whatever you think of, I’m going to guess they’re all alive.

But what makes something alive or not alive? What makes zebras leap and run, whereas rocks are forever immobile? What makes these living beings different from a vast galaxy or the Pillars of Creation? Continue reading

What is Gravity, Anyway?

Welcome to my second “Science Answers” post! About a month ago, I sent out a post requesting science questions from all of you; you can find it here. This post addresses the second of the questions I was asked. If you have a question, you can ask it in the comments here or on that post, or ask it in an email. Or find me on Facebook!

Q: What is gravity? (asked by Simon)

Wow…great question. This is a question the greatest scientific minds have asked and tried to answer for centuries. It’s a question not even Stephen Hawking, the scientific genius of the century, has fully answered.

There are a few parts to the gravity question, and they have each been addressed one by one over time:

  • How does gravity work?
  • What is gravity?
  • Why does gravity work?

Isaac Newton stood on the shoulders of the giants before him—Aristotle, Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Kepler—and figured out how gravity works. But he was at a loss to explain what exactly this mysterious force was.

Einstein built on Newton’s work and came up with a theory for what gravity is—that is, distortions in space-time.

spacetime

We have yet to understand why gravity works. Why is space-time warped? Why do objects distort it as if it were the material of a trampoline? What exactly is the nature of space?

But, lucky for me, the question above specifically asks what gravity is. And that, I can explain.

The best way to do that is to turn one of gravity’s oldest tricks, one that has perplexed scientists and philosophers for thousands of years: What makes the planets move? Continue reading

Science Questions, Anybody? (#1)

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I want to try out something new. Up until now, for every post on this blog, I have chosen a topic and written about it in the hopes that you’re curious about it.

This time, I want to know what you are curious about.

You’re welcome to ask any question about science. No matter what it is, I will do my best to answer it. If I don’t immediately know the answer, I’ll research it. And remember—there are no stupid questions, only stupid answers.

Just leave your question in the comments below. If you’re not a WordPress user, you’ll need to enter your name and email address, but I’m the only person who will ever see your email.

I will answer every question that’s asked. Depending on how many there are, I’ll either answer them all in a post coming up soon, or I’ll answer one in each of a series of posts to be published over the next few days.

If you think you know the answer to your question but aren’t quite sure, you’re still welcome to ask it—and even let me know what you think the answer is! I’ll make sure to point out what you’re right about when I answer your question.

I’ll also reproduce the question and credit you (the name you use in the comment form) for asking it. Then I’ll answer your question in detail. If anything’s still not clear afterwards, you are welcome to comment again or email me.

All answers will be archived on my “Myth & Science” page, underneath the “Science Answers” drop-down menu.

I’ll keep comments open for a few weeks. But if you miss out on this first “Science Questions, Anybody?”, don’t worry about it. I’ll do this again sometime soon.

Questions, anyone?

Update 5/11/18: You can now submit questions through the form on my “Got Questions?” page up in the menu. The guidelines are the same: anything you’re curious about, I’ll answer. There are no stupid questions, only stupid answers. I look forward to hearing from you!